ASPP/PSU Annual Fall Conference

Association of School Psychologists of Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania State University
2022 Fall Conference

November 2 & 3, 2022
 

Welcome to the 2022 ASPP/Penn State University Fall Conference

Once again, it is time for the annual Fall Conference. WE ARE…Back!! We are excited to return to an in-person conference - Workshops will include a variety of 90-minute and 3-hour sessions to meet the professional development needs of school psychologists and other related professionals. 

We have simplified registration to include both days for all registrants. In addition, we are continuing to offer a package deal for training institutions and students so that they may benefit from all that our conference has to offer!!  

We will continue to offer the full-day event Robert G. Bernreuter lecture, Joseph French lecture, and many other lectures and workshops by your colleagues from across the Commonwealth. With workshops geared towards MTSS, interventions, emotional and mental health, and other important topics relating to the practice of school psychology, our 2022 Fall Conference is sure to be a valuable two days of professional development and is not to be missed!!
 
We look forward to seeing you in person this November!
 
ASPP Conference Planning Committee --
Dr. David Lillenstein, NCSP; Jim Glynn, NCSP; Dr. Shirley Woika, NCSP
 

Conference Brochure
 

In partnership with the Midwestern Intermediate Unit IV, Act 48 credits will be reported to the Pennsylvania Department of Education.  ASPP has been approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Psychology (Provider Number:  PY-000001-L) and the National Association of School Psychologists (Provider Number: 1036) to offer continuing education for psychologists.  This program qualifies for such continuing education.  ASPP maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
 
Register for Conference

 

Wednesday, November 2, 2022

 

7:30 am to 8:30 am — Coffee & Continental Breakfast & Registration

 

8:30 am to 10:00 am — Morning Session 1

 

Improving Emergent Reading Skills with a Multisensory Approach

(NASP Domains 1,3)

Emergent reading skills are the building blocks for word recognition, reading fluency, and reading comprehension. Letter name and letter sound knowledge falls under emergent reading skills. The Multisensory Letter Name and Sound Intervention, along with progress monitoring data to support evidence-based decision making, is essential for students who are experiencing difficulties with letter name and sound knowledge. Presenters will review current research supporting the importance of letter name and sound knowledge as an early learner. The implementation process of the Multisensory Letter Name and Sound Intervention, as well as the results from the letter name and letter sound probes prior to and following implementation, will be discussed. 

Dr. Chelsea Pruznak - School Psychologist - South Middleton School District
Alyssa Sunday - School Psychologist - South Middleton School District
 

School Staff Perceptions on the Impact of Trauma on Students

(NASP Domains 3,4,5,6,7,8,10)

According to the Centers for Disease Control (cdc.org, 2021), more than 61% of adults have reported experiences of trauma during their childhood. These experiences include physical or sexual abuse, psychological stress, and socio-economic challenges. Evidently, survivors of adverse childhood experiences suffer physical, emotional, behavioral, and psychological stress during their adult years (Shonkoff et al., 2012). The issue has gained much interest in the last three decades. While researchers are looking into more information and data on the problem, schools and other institutions are looking into intervention and prevention methods to best protect children. Today, schools across the United States are implementing trauma-informed care practices in their curriculum and teaching strategies, to help students who have experienced trauma. Researchers on intervention methods for trauma among school-aged children have called for teacher training and support (Berger, Bearsley & Lever, 2020; Gherardi, Flinn & Blanca Jaure, 2020). The main purpose of this non-experimental, descriptive study is to explore the ways in which school staff in the United States perceive the impact of trauma on their students, the concept of trauma-informed schools, and view the role of partnerships in supporting trauma-exposed students. 

The overarching aim of this study is to better understand how school staff members perceive students who have been exposed to trauma, and what their perceptions and beliefs are about how best to support these students in the school setting. This workshop will discuss the preliminary results and implications of this study.

Dr. Kirby Wycoff, NCSP - Professor - Thomas Jefferson University
Felicia Folen - Graduate Student - Eastern University
Michelle Tulik - Graduate Student - Thomas Jefferson University
Gloria Wafula - Doctoral Student - West Chester University
 

School Psychologists Supporting MTSS for Mathematics - Part 1

(NASP Domains 1,3)

In our work as statewide technical assistance providers, we support many school teams through training, consultation, and coaching to improve systems and outcomes for mathematics for every student. We have the opportunity to work with school psychologists, who often indicate they are more comfortable engaging in systems-level work for literacy, behavior, and social-emotional learning than for mathematics. Yet, implementation of an effective MTSS-M is a significant need for schools across the country. School psychologists’ problem-solving skills can be helpful not only at the individual student level, but also at a systems level to help schools implement an MTSS-M. Consider this definition of MTSS - The systematic use of assessment data to most efficiently allocate resources in order to enhance learning for all students (Burns, et al., 2016). How can school psychologists effectively engage in systems-level work for mathematics to ensure effective, efficient, and equitable allocation of resources to meet the needs of every student? Additionally, how can school psychologists effectively partner with math educators and other stakeholders in a meaningful way to support groups of students and individual students? We provide context and helpful tips for multiple entry points where school psychologists can engage in this work.  In this session, we will provide school psychologists with opportunities to deepen their understanding of effective mathematical practices in core instruction and intervention, as well as the use of data to drive decision making to enhance mathematics outcomes for students. We will review practical strategies school psychologists can take, no matter their entry point at their school or district, to support an effective MTSS for mathematics.

Dr. Erica Kaurudar, NCSP - Educational Consultant - PATTAN-Harrisburg
Jared Campbell - Educational Consultant - PATTAN-Harrisburg
 

Joseph French Lecture - Inside Out: Mental Health Interventions in Schools - Part 1

(NASP Domains 2,4,5,6)

Although schools have always been on the frontlines providing mental health services to students, recent increases in student mental health needs have posited many additional challenges for schools. In addition, many students struggle to access outpatient and acute mental health care due to various socio-economic factors as well as a shortage of available providers in many regions. Within the practice of school psychology, many school psychologists find themselves struggling on how to help students while balancing high volumes of referrals, crisis, and other student needs. This presentation provides participants with an overview of mental health needs in our state and evidenced-based interventions to address student mental health across a multi-tiered system of supports. Participants will be provided with evidenced-based interventions as well as real world adaptations for these interventions in schools. Lastly, participants will be provided with opportunities to discuss unique challenges posed by their roles on how to address mental health needs of students in their various schools.

Dr. Katherine Palladino - Licensed Psychologist/School Psychologist - Growthworks
Dr. Meghan Garrett - Professor - Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Dr. Caitlin Gilmartin - School Psychologist - Colonial School District
Beenish Rashid - Doctoral Student - Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
 

Assessing Memory Using the WRAML3 in School Settings - Part 1

(NASP Domains 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9,10)

Because of its central importance in so many cognitive and emotional functions and its relative vulnerability, assessing memory has become an important focus in most comprehensive psycho-educational assessments of children. This workshop will examine important clinical aspects of verbal, visual and working memory assessment using the newly revised Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning Third Edition as an organizing model for assessment as well as interpretation. The test's co-author will conduct the workshop. Special attention will be given to clinical components such as generating and utilizing short- and longer-term memory data, utilizing process measures, and estimating effort using embedded performance validity indicators. Classroom and home-based recommendations related to various WRAML3 findings will also be included. 

Dr. Wayne Adams - Professor Emeritus - George Fox University

10:15 am to 11:45 pm — Morning Session 2

 


School Psychologists Supporting MTSS for Mathematics - Part 2 - continued from AM Session 1

(NASP Domains 1,2,3,5)

In our work as statewide technical assistance providers, we support many school teams through training, consultation, and coaching to improve systems and outcomes for mathematics for every student. We have the opportunity to work with school psychologists, who often indicate they are more comfortable engaging in systems-level work for literacy, behavior, and social-emotional learning than for mathematics. Yet implementation of an effective MTSS-M is a significant need for schools across the country. School psychologists’ problem-solving skills can be helpful not only at the individual student level, but also at a systems level to help schools implement an MTSS-M. Consider this definition of MTSS - The systematic use of assessment data to most efficiently allocate resources in order to enhance learning for all students (Burns, et al., 2016). How can school psychologists effectively engage in systems-level work for mathematics to ensure effective, efficient, and equitable allocation of resources to meet the needs of every student? Additionally, how can school psychologists effectively partner with math educators and other stakeholders in a meaningful way to support groups of students and individual students? We provide context and helpful tips for multiple entry points where school psychologists can engage in this work.  In this session, we will provide school psychologists with opportunities to deepen their understanding of effective mathematical practices in core instruction and intervention, as well as the use of data to drive decision making to enhance mathematics outcomes for students. We will review practical strategies school psychologists can take, no matter their entry point at their school or district, to support an effective MTSS for mathematics.

Dr. Erica Kaurudar, NCSP - School Psychologist/Educational Consultant - PATTAN-Harrisburg
Jared Campbell - Educational Consultant - PATTAN-Harrisburg
 

Joseph French Lecture - Inside Out: Mental Health Interventions in Schools - Part 2 - continued from AM Session 1

(NASP Domains 2,4,5,6)

Although schools have always been on the frontlines providing mental health services to students, recent increases in student mental health needs have posited many additional challenges for schools. In addition, many students struggle to access outpatient and acute mental health care due to various socio-economic factors as well as a shortage of available providers in many regions. Within the practice of school psychology, many school psychologists find themselves struggling on how to help students while balancing high volumes of referrals, crisis, and other student needs. This presentation provides participants with an overview of mental health needs in our state and evidenced-based interventions to address student mental health across a multi-tiered system of supports. Participants will be provided with evidenced-based interventions as well as real world adaptations for these interventions in schools. Lastly, participants will be provided with opportunities to discuss unique challenges posed by their roles on how to address mental health needs of students in their various schools.

Dr. Katherine Palladino - Licensed Psychologist/School Psychologist - Growthworks
Dr. Meghan Garrett - Professor - Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Dr. Caitlin Gilmartin - School Psychologist - Colonial School District
Beenish Rashid - Doctoral Student - Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
 

Assessing Memory Using the WRAML3 in School Settings - Part 2 - continued from AM Session 1

(NASP Domains 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9,10)

Because of its central importance in so many cognitive and emotional functions and its relative vulnerability, assessing memory has become an important focus in most comprehensive psycho-educational assessments of children. This workshop will examine important clinical aspects of verbal, visual and working memory assessment using the newly revised Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning, Third Edition as an organizing model for assessment as well as interpretation. The test's co-author will conduct the workshop. Special attention will be given to clinical components such as generating and utilizing short- and longer-term memory data, utilizing process measures, and estimating effort using embedded performance validity indicators. Classroom and home-based recommendations related to various WRAML3 findings will also be included. 

Dr. Wayne Adams - Professor Emeritus - George Fox University
 

The Role of the School Psychologist in Transition Planning

(NASP Domains 1,2,4,7,10)

Transition planning is an essential part of the successful education of students with disabilities, whether they are moving on to post-secondary education or training, employment, independent living, or residential placement. School psychologists are often under-utilized but valuable assets in the transition planning process. However, there is infrequent emphasis placed on the contribution of the school psychologist in the transition planning process. For students with disabilities pursuing post-secondary education or training, poor or non-existent transition evaluations may result in them being denied accommodations necessary for success in the academic setting. For students pursuing post-secondary employment, a lack of transition planning may cause them to be unprepared for the demands of employment, leading to continued rates of high unemployment for individuals with disabilities. For families seeking residential placement or other adult services for the student with a disability, poor transition planning may result in them being denied access to adult services or them being placed on interminably long waiting lists before services can begin. Adequate transition planning, skillfully facilitated by the school psychologist, can do much to prevent these undesirable outcomes. From assessment to person-centered planning, participants will explore the role that school psychologists can play in effective transition planning. 

Dr. Carrie Jackson - Professor - Youngstown State University
 

How to Improve the School Psychologist to Student Ratio and Expand Mental Health Services

(NASP Domains 1,2,4,6,7)

This presentation will provide participants with specific steps that can be used to effectively advocate for and acquire additional school psychologists and thus, expand mental health services in their school districts. Participants will be provided a roadmap for how one western PA school district has been able to add school psychologist positions, with one position specifically designated for psychological counseling. The presentation will include various data needed to justify additional positions, fiscally responsible ways to introduce expanded psychological services, proposed additional roles and services possible with reduced ratios, an administrative perspective on how to advocate, ways that a position focusing on psychological counseling can integrate into existing mental health services, the referral process for psychological counseling, evidence-based counseling techniques, and sample psychological counseling cases with progress monitoring data. The presentation will also address potential challenges and barriers to this process. 

Dr. Lynn Kiselica - School Psychologist - North Hills School District
Dr. Miriam Ferguson - School Psychologist - North Hills School District
Dr. Nicole Bezila - Director of Pupil Services - North Hills School District

LUNCH BREAK --- 12:00-1:00 --- In the Atrium - 


NASP/ASPP Updates!!

1:15 pm to 2:45 pm – Afternoon Session 1

 


Selling SEL - A Journey to Implementing SEL Practices - Part 1

(NASP Domains 4,5,6,8,9)

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) skills are inextricably connected to those skills individuals need to be successful in life both personally and professionally. In order for schools to meet the needs of all students, it is imperative that SEL inform practices from instruction to discipline to PBIS to MTSS. This presentation will describe one school district's journey in changing practices, training staff, implementing SEL practices, connections to the PA Career Ready Skills, as well as program evaluation.

Dr. Jason Pedersen, NCSP - School Psychologist - Derry Township School District
Sara Wendell - Graduate Student - Lehigh University
Jessica Lathrop - Graduate Student - Lehigh University
 

A Brief Screening to Respond to Mass Traumatic Events - Part 1

(NASP Domains 1,6)

The authors of this paper proposed and designed the Differential Stress Response Survey (DSRS) to gather quantifiable data, which inform treatment and needs of students during traumatic events impacting the school and/or community. Data collected are intended to inform treatment via a MTSS model. This will aid swift service delivery and recommendations for groups of students in crises. The objectives of this presentation will be to; (1) learn to assess students with various social-emotional needs; (2) support trauma-informed care in the school, home and community; and (3) use quantifiable data to inform MTSS and SEL approaches.

Dr. Tiffany Jenkins, NCSP - School Psychologist - Authentically Black Services, LLC & TKJ H.E.L.P.S., LLC
Dr. Kevin Donley - Licensed Psychologist/School Psychologist - CORA Services, Inc. 
 

To Attend or Not to Attend: Examining the Law and Psychology of School Refusal and Truancy - Part 1

(NASP Domains 1,2,4,6,7,10)

School refusal and truancy are some of the most challenging behaviors faced by educators. The prevalence and implications of school refusal and truancy have been compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic. Among other factors, the increase in virtual learning, mental health disorders, and social restrictions have resulted in an increase in these challenging behaviors. This unique session combines the expertise of a school attorney and school psychologist to discuss school refusal and truancy with an emphasis on a post-pandemic educational setting. School refusal and truancy and their underlying factors will be defined and discussed. Utilizing an ecological perspective, multi-tiered systems of support approach to school refusal and truancy focusing on universal prevention and targeted intervention will be discussed. Legally aligned assessment will be reviewed and relevant cases will be analyzed along with legal tips to keep your school district compliant with federal law and court decisions. 

Dr. Jessica Dirsmith, NCSP - Professor - Duquesne University
Rebecca Heaton Hall - Attorney - Weiss Burkardt Kramer, Pittsburgh
 

TRAILS: School-based Mental Health Practices in Action

(NASP Domains 1,4)

With mental health concerns on the rise among school-aged youth, the TRAILS to Wellness program is a school-based, evidence-based mental health program that shows promising results in reducing symptomatology. However, limited outside research has been conducted at this time. Presenters will discuss results from an anxiety-based screener administered prior to and following implementation, in addition to summarizing the implementation process and feasibility of the TRAILS to Wellness program.

Dr. Chelsea Pruznak - School Psychologist - South Middleton School District
Alyssa Sunday - School Psychologist - South Middleton School District
 

The Role of the School Psychologist in Transition Planning

(NASP Domains 1,2,4,6,7)

The goal of this workshop is to increase school psychologist awareness of transition requirements and the impact on the evaluation/reevaluation process, as well as the role the school psychologist can play in collecting and interpreting transition assessment.

Dr. Hillary Mangis - School Psychologist/Educational Consultant - PATTAN-Pittsburgh

3:00 pm to 4:30 pm — Afternoon Session 2

 


Selling SEL - A Journey to Implementing SEL Practices - Part 2 - continued from PM Session 1

(NASP Domains 4,5,6,8,9)

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) skills are inextricably connected to those skills individuals need to be successful in life both personally and professionally. In order for schools to meet the needs of all students, it is imperative that SEL inform practices from instruction to discipline to PBIS to MTSS. This presentation will describe one school district's journey in changing practices, training staff, implementing SEL practices, connections to the PA Career Ready Skills, as well as program evaluation.

Dr. Jason Pedersen, NCSP - School Psychologist - Derry Township School District
Sara Wendell - Graduate Student - Lehigh University
Jessica Lathrop - Graduate Student - Lehigh University
 

A Brief Screening to Respond to Mass Traumatic Events - Part 2 - continued from PM Session 1

(NASP Domains 1,6)

The authors of this paper proposed and designed the Differential Stress Response Survey (DSRS) to gather quantifiable data, which inform treatment and needs of students during traumatic events impacting the school and/or community. Data collected are intended to inform treatment via a MTSS model. This will aid swift service delivery and recommendations for groups of students in crises. The objectives of this presentation will be to; (1) learn to assess students with various social-emotional needs; (2) support trauma-informed care in the school, home and community; and (3) use quantifiable data to inform MTSS and SEL approaches.

Dr. Tiffany Jenkins, NCSP - School Psychologist - Authentically Black Services, LLC & TKJ H.E.L.P.S., LLC
Dr. Kevin Donley - Licensed Psychologist/School Psychologist - CORA Services, Inc. 
 

To Attend or Not to Attend: Examining the Law and Psychology of School Refusal and Truancy - Part 2 - continued from PM Session 1

(NASP Domains 1,2,4,6,7,10)

School refusal and truancy are some of the most challenging behaviors faced by educators. The prevalence and implications of school refusal and truancy have been compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic. Among other factors, the increase in virtual learning, mental health disorders, and social restrictions have resulted in an increase in these challenging behaviors. This unique session combines the expertise of a school attorney and school psychologist to discuss school refusal and truancy with an emphasis on a post-pandemic educational setting. School refusal and truancy and their underlying factors will be defined and discussed. Utilizing an ecological perspective, multi-tiered systems of support approach to school refusal and truancy focusing on universal prevention and targeted intervention will be discussed. Legally aligned assessment will be reviewed and relevant cases will be analyzed along with legal tips to keep your school district compliant with federal law and court decisions. 

Dr. Jessica Dirsmith, NCSP - Professor - Duquesne University
Rebecca Heaton Hall - Attorney - Weiss Burkardt Kramer, Pittsburgh
 

Start by Admiring the Problem: Momentum for Change

(NASP Domains 1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9,10)

School entities often marvel at the barriers preventing student achievement without then creating solutions to those issues. Examples of barriers observed and/or encountered are lower rates of student achievement as a result of COVID-19 school closures, lower rates of advanced placement class enrollment by minority students, disproportionate discipline of minority students and/or students identified with an educational disability, and an increase in the rate of students self-reporting mental health concerns.  Using the Bergan and Kratochwill problem solving consultation framework, participants will be introduced to the various types and categories of data that can be collected and analyzed in order to demonstrate the severity and/or rate of educational barriers. Participants will be taught how to complete equity audits to identify rates of disproportionality. Participants will practice analyzing data to form a cohesive, operationalized problem statement. Participants will discuss how to aggregate the data into a visual and/or written format that is easily understandable. Participants will learn to formulate a research-based solution to the identified barrier given the data. Finally, participants will be shown a step-by-step example of how one suburban high school identified the need for school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports.

Anne Wiest - School Psychologist - Downingtown Area School District
 

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction: Power of the Practice

(NASP Domains 2,4,5,6)

MBSR: Empowering school psychologists with increased presence, awareness, and connectivity resulting in workplace stress reduction. Mindfulness must be experienced to be known. Learn mindfulness meditation practices that develop awareness of body, heart, and mind. In this self-care skills presentation, seasoned school psychologists will (a) review MBSR literature, (b) experience three formal mindfulness practices and inquiry, (c) learn two mindfulness practices to reduce stress during communication.

Ali Turf - School Psychologist - Detroit Public School Community School District
 

6:00 pm to 8:00 pm — ALWAYS FREE, ALWAYS FUN Annual Dick Hall Beef & Brew, Auction, and Poster Session

 

 

Thursday, November 3, 2022

 

7:00 am to 8:00 am — Coffee & Continental Breakfast 

 

Robert G. Bernreuter Lecture

 

Dr. Shannon Suldo - University of South Florida


Research provides robust evidence that students’ mental health is closely tied to their school behavior and academic achievement, and suggests critical developmental periods for prevention and intervention efforts. In addition to preventing and reducing mental health problems, fostering students’ subjective well-being (i.e., happiness) is essential to ensuring optimal outcomes. This day of professional development will convey best practices in promotion of student complete mental health through implementation of universal programs and practices that build social-emotional-behavioral competencies and prevent psychological problems, identification of students in need of supplemental services, and provision of evidence-based interventions to enhance the subjective well-being of all students and teachers in the classroom.

8:00 am to 11:00 am – Robert G. Bernreuter Lecture


Morning Topic: Promoting Students’ Complete Mental Health in a Multi-Tiered Framework

This workshop describes best practices in promotion of all students’ emotional and behavioral health, in part to eradicate barriers to learning that stem from mental health problems.  Empirical links between students’ mental health and academic success will be summarized. This research-based rationale for school mental health services suggests priority needs as well as critical developmental periods for prevention and intervention efforts. Participants will learn best practice models for promoting student mental health through a multi-tiered framework that includes universal (Tier 1), targeted (Tier 2), and indicated/individual and crisis services (Tier 3). Addressing the Tier 1 level, participants will learn programs and practices to promote all children’s emotional well-being and reduce/prevent emotional and behavioral problems. In addition to preventing and reducing mental health problems, enhancing students’ subjective well-being is essential to ensure optimal outcomes. This presentation will put forth a model of complete mental health that directs attention to both positive and negative indicators of well-being and problems respectively. This dual-factor model has been incorporated into statewide and district planning for fostering students' complete mental health. At the Tier 2 level, participants will become familiar with example evidence-based options for time-limited programs for common mental health challenges. Planning for the Tier 3 level, participants will consider district personnel and community resources likely to be the most appropriate partners for various mental health services. 

11:00 pm to 12:30 pm – Lunch on your own!

 

12:30 pm to 3:30 pm – Bernreuter Lecture Continued


Afternoon Topic: Positive Psychology in Education: Fostering Happiness and Relationships at School to Improve Student Outcomes

This workshop will convey best practices for promoting student complete mental health, through positive psychology programs and practices that generate positive emotions and strengthen relationships. Positive psychology conceptualizes mental health as the presence of strengths, virtues, and happiness. This workshop will increase participants’ knowledge of how to assess and promote students’ happiness.  Evidence-based positive psychology programs and practices across a range of psychological services will be reviewed, including universal (schoolwide and classwide), small group, and individualized interventions for students. This workshop will also introduce innovative ways to promote teachers’ positive mental health. Participants will learn strategies for supporting teachers’ stress management, wellness promotion, and blended approaches that both decrease negative emotions and increase positive emotions through interventions that cultivate gratitude and use of signature character strengths. Participants will learn specific programs and practices for promoting all children’s happiness through strategies that target improvements in the factors correlated with children’s subjective well-being, including students’ personal levels of gratitude, hope, and use of character strengths. In sum, participants will gain knowledge of how to assess and promote students’ and educators’ happiness. 

Shannon Suldo, Ph.D., is a Professor in the School Psychology Program at the University of South Florida.  She received her Ph.D. in School Psychology from the University of South Carolina in 2004. She is a Licensed Psychologist in the state of Florida and continues to provide school-based mental health services to youth in the Tampa area. She has extensive research and clinical experiences in school-based mental health services, including: establishing empirical links between student mental health and academic success; conceptualizing and measuring student mental health in a dual-factor model that considers psychopathology and well-being; evidence-based positive psychology interventions for promoting positive indicators of student well-being; schoolwide strategies to identify youth with mental health problems; and supporting teachers’ emotional well-being. She also studies the stress, coping strategies, and mental health of high school students in accelerated courses, and is principal investigator of two large federal grants to identify and build factors that predict success among students in advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses. She is also principal investigator of a large federal grant to evaluate a selective positive psychology intervention to increase middle school students’ subjective well-being. She has published more than 75 studies that convey findings from her research on how to assess and promote complete mental health. She is the author of Promoting Student Happiness: Positive Psychology Interventions in Schools, a 2016 book within the Guilford Practical Intervention in the Schools Series; co-editor of Fostering the Emotional Well-Being of our Youth: A School-Based Approach, a 2021 book published by Oxford; and co-editor of the Handbook of Positive Psychology in Schools: Supporting Process and Practice (3rd edition), a 2022 book published by Routledge.

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Why join ASPP?

ASPP is committed to providing its members the following benefits:
A link between national and state associations.
Annual regional fall workshops and spring conference at reduced fees.
A collective voice for professional concerns and dissemination of information.
Unified power in soliciting the assistance of state legislators and regulatory agencies and in making known the needs and opinions of school psychologists.
Current information within the profession as provided by the Insight and the Association website, including information about upcoming events, professional best practices, state and national happenings, accomplishments of our members, and new or updated products and publications relevant to the profession.
Support for the ethical practice of school psychology, in part through ASPP’s adoption of NASP’s standards and ethics, as well as consultation with members regarding the delivery of school psychology services to Pennsylvania’s children.
Networking opportunities at conferences, including a members’ reception at NASP’s annual convention.
Support for shaping and defining the future of our professional roles.
 

What can you offer to ASPP?

Your membership to enhance ASPP’s collective strength in numbers.
Your active participation in Association activities for professional development.
Your service as an Association officer or committee member.
Your commitment to the goals of ASPP and support to fulfill the objectives of the Association.
Your help in advancing and promoting best practices.

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NASP Practice Model Domains of Practice
Domain 1: Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability
Domain 2: Consultation and Collaboration
Domain 3: Intervention and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills
Domain 4: Intervention and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
Domain 5: School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning
Domain 6: Preventative and Responsive Services
Domain 7: Family-School Collaboration Services
Domain 8: Diversity in Development and Learning
Domain 9: Research and Program Evaluation
Domain 10: Legal, Ethical and Professional Practice

 

Conference General Information

 
Registration Fee:
The conference registration fee covers session attendance for both days. Early registration is advised. Non-members are welcome to register but encouraged to join ASPP for professional reasons as well as a reduced fee.

Hotel Accommodations:                    
The Ramada Inn and Conference Center - State College has reserved a block of rooms for those attending the ASPP Fall Conference. Reservations must be made DIRECTLY with the hotel and should be made as soon as possible. Be sure to indicate that you are attending the ASPP Fall Conference. Ramada Inn and Conference Center – State College, 1450 South Atherton Street, State College, PA 16801, 814-238-3001. ASPP Rates – Single or Double = $86+11% tax = $95.46, IF RESERVED BEFORE 10/30/22.    

Vendors and Public Relations:
For your convenience, there will be display tables for NASP products as well as various companies.    

ASPP Auction/Graduate Student NASP Conference Stipend:
Tickets will be sold to raffle a variety of donated items, with the drawings held during the Beef & Brew on Wednesday.  The proceeds from the raffle will support a stipend for a graduate student to attend the Annual NASP Conference.  The items will be on display Wednesday until the drawing that evening.  Attendance at the Beef & Brew is not necessary.      
                    
Continuing Professional Development Credits:
In partnership with the Midwestern Intermediate Unit IV, Act 48 credits will be reported to the Pennsylvania Department of Education.  ASPP has been approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Psychology (Provider Number: PY-000001-L) and the National Association of School Psychologists (Provider Number: 1036) to offer continuing education for psychologists.  This program qualifies for such continuing education.  ASPP maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
 
Cancellation/Dissatisfaction Policy:
Cancellation requests must be made in writing to: dlillenstein@hershey.k12.pa.us and sent no later than 10/31/22 to receive a refund minus a $25 processing fee.  Cancellation refunds will be sent within 4 weeks after the conference.  If you are dissatisfied with any aspect of the conference or presentations, please provide feedback on the participant satisfaction form.  In addition, ASPP requests that grievances or concerns regarding the conference be addressed to Dr. David Lillenstein at 717-443-2361 or dlillenstein@hershey.k12.pa.us